2014 Challenge, Week 41: COMPOSITION – RULE OF ODDS

This weeks composition challenge is all about looking at things in an odd way — an odd number, that is.

“Odd Numbers” by Billy Abbott

One of the simplest ways to make a composition more dynamic is to have an odd number of objects in it, rather than an even number. An even number of things tends to make the viewer pair or group the objects. However, an odd number of things tends to make it more difficult to pair the objects, which keeps the eyes moving across the composition.

“Three Across” by Thomas Hawk

Since the subject matter is not limited on this challenge, you should have plenty of opportunity to watch for odd numbers of things, and come up with an interesting image for the week.

“Five Pillars” by Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen\

Architecture, nature, still life, macro, color, black and white — it’s all fair game for this challenge!

“The Magnificent Seven” by « м Ħ ж »

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.

Now get out there and find something odd!

2014 Challenge, Week 37: COMPOSITION – LINES & PATTERNS

This weeks challenge is to make a composition that includes lines and/or patterns.

Architecture subjects can be a good source of lines and patterns.

“windows” by Antonio Culicigno

This image has strong lines, includes a person (notice the composition puts the person on one of the thirds) and uses reflection effectively.

“Lines” by Georgie Pauwels

Lines don’t have to be straight. Curved lines can be appealing as well.

“Lines And Curves” by Jon Herbert

When looking for patterns, try to find things that are repeating in interesting ways.

“red monster” by joseph.steufer

“Disrupting The Pattern” by Matthias Weinberger

“wishbone spiral” by paul bica

The rules are pretty simple:

Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+, Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

Now get out there, find some lines and patterns, and have fun!

Photochallenge Calendars – For A Good Cause

“Desk Calendar” by stopthegears

Hello Photochallenge friends! As you may have read, Trevor, the founding member of photochallenge.org, has been fighting Leukemia for the last year or so. He has had ups and downs, but is on the road to recovery.

Gary, one of the other photochallenge authors, came up with an idea to help Trevor out with the mounting expenses related to his illness, and the rest of us think it is a great idea. We are going to publish a photochallenge.org 2015 calendar using images that you, the photochallenge.org members, submit! All proceeds from the sales of the calendar will go directly to Trevor and his family.

To submit a photo, go to the photochallenge.org group on Facebook, click the “Albums” tab, and add your photo to the “2015 Photochallenge.org Calendar” album.

The photo:

  1. Must be a photo you made for one of the 2014 challenges.
  2. Must not have any watermarks; we will list your name with the image on the calendar.
  3. Should include a title.
  4. Must specify which challenge it was for.

The photochallenge authors will select images to include on the calendar based on image format, image size, and how many we can fit on the calendar. Due to limited space on the calendar, we cannot guarantee that every submitted image will be used, but we will include as many as possible. If we get enough submissions, we may consider more than one calendar, each with a different theme. Submissions will be due by the end of September, and calendars will be available for purchase by the end of October.

Submitting an image for consideration means that you are granting a worldwide, perpetual license for the image to be used in the 2015 Photochallenge.org calendar and for promotional purposes related to the calendar. Photochallenge.org is not asserting any ownership of the image, and the image will not be used for other purposes.

We are really looking forward to seeing what everyone chooses to submit, and we thank you for your support!

Update: We have had some people ask how they can submit images via Flickr and Google+. For those sites, just tag the image you want to submit with “photochallenge2015calendar”. We will use the tag to find images. Thanks!

2014 Challenge, Week 36: LANDSCAPE – HORIZON

Hello all, we are back to the LANDSCAPE theme, and this week’s theme gives you a lot of leeway. In fact, most of the landscape themes we have practiced this year could be adapted to fit this theme.

“big skies” by Georgie Sharp

This week, try to get the big picture. Show us sweeping, grand landscapes, with a clearly defined horizon.

“Sunset from Sète” by JM L.

When shooting, try using a smaller aperture to get lots of depth of field. This will help convey a sense of scale and the feeling that the horizon goes on and on and on….

“Ocean Flight” by Simon & His Camera

Don’t be afraid of black and white. The contrast between sky and land can be shown nicely in a black and white image.

“Untitled” by santo rizzuto

Have a wide angle lens? Don’t be afraid to use it! If you don’t have a wide lens, try making a panorama!

“Miles of Sky” by Kevin Galens

Sky? Yes! Clouds? Oh yeah! Snow? You know it! Mountains? Absolutely! Ocean? Of course! Sunset? Oui!

There are a lot of landscape horizon opportunities out there, you just have to get out and shoot!

The rules are pretty simple:

Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+, Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 33: COMPOSITION – BACKGROUND

It’s time for another composition challenge. This time, we are going to concentrate on the background of your photo – the things that are not the subject of the photo.

It’s easy to pay so much attention to the subject of the photo that you end up with distracting background elements. This week, take some time to look at what is behind your subject, and see if you can figure out how to remove those distracting elements.

One way to do this is by careful placement of foreground and background elements. In this example, the subject of the image (a girl) is positioned so that there is only sky and water in the background. The pier in the background is off to the left, helping to frame the subject rather than interfering with the subject. The lighting and exposure emphasize the subject, and the depth of field and use of a LensBaby keep the focus on the subject, rendering other elements less focused.

“Beach Girl” by John Curley

The example above used a flash, diffuser, and special lens, but it is not necessary to use a lot of equipment to simplify the background of an image. This flower was shot in natural light using a piece of white paper as a background.

“Flower” by Simon Whitaker

Another way to remove distracting background elements is to use a large aperture, resulting in sharp focus on the subject and out of focus background. You can refer back to week 10 for more tips on depth of field.

“At The Bourbon Bar” by Jeremy Brooks

Take some time when composing your shots this week. Look around the entire frame and make sure there are no elements in the background that are distracting. With some practice, this will become second nature. Now get out there and have some fun!

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 29: COMPOSITION – FILL THE FRAME

This week we are going to try out a composition technique that encourages you to get up close to your subject – filling the frame. This week, try to do more than emphasize your subject — try to fill up as much of the frame as possible with your subject.

“Playing The Blues” by Jeremy Brooks

If you want to try this with a portrait, you may need to get closer than you would normally be comfortable with. But don’t be afraid! Get in close and don’t feel like you have to show all of the person — or even all of their face — in the frame.

Larger subjects in nature can also be good choices. Notice how the sunflower and peacock fill up the frame, emphasizing the subject matter.

“12.10.13” by Marie Coleman

“Fill the frame” by Nina Matthews

 

If you have a macro lens, or if your camera has a macro setting, you can get close to the subject, capturing details and filling the frame at the same time.

“Red” by TumblingRun

 

Manmade subjects are also a great option to fill the frame with. Depending on the size of the object, you might be able to stand back and still fill the frame.

“Living In Curves” by Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen

“Untitled” by Mònica Vidal

 

It might be helpful to use a zoom lens for this challenge. If you don’t have a zoom lens, don’t worry — you can always zoom with your feet! Don’t be afraid to get up close to your subject this week. Let’s see some filled up frames!

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

Now get out there and have some fun!

2014 Challenge, Week 25: COMPOSITION – FRAMING

This week, lets get back to a technical challenge and talk about framing when composing the photo. Framing is a composition technique that allows you to emphasize the subject by blocking parts of the photo with something in the scene.

“Framed Sunset” by Sudhamshu Heb

Framing your subject with something in the frame can give the photo context, helping the viewer understand where the image was taken and what was happening. It can draw attention to the subject. It can give the image a sense of depth.

“In The Frame” by Alison Christine

If you are not sure how to frame an image like this, try looking out of a window. Including the walls around the window will frame the subject outside the window.

“Window On The World” by Jeremy Brooks

Framing can also be used to add interest to a portrait. Perhaps you could try to make a portrait this week by framing your subject in an interesting or different way.

“s1″ by Melissa Brooks

As always, please post/share a photo you take THIS WEEK. We love your old photos, but not for the challenge. The point of the PhotoChallenges is for you to set out to create a new photo, to share with us all this week. Share them with us all at our Google+ CommunityFacebook Group, and/or our Flickr Group.

Now go have some fun!