2015 Challenge, Week 13: MACRO – BATHROOM

It’s been four weeks since the last macro challenge. This time, we are going to find something interesting in a specific room of the house – the bathroom! Have you ever looked around your bathroom for interesting photographic opportunities? If not, you might be in for a surprise.

“Toothbrush Bristles” by William Warby

Everyday items take on a new dimension when photographed close up. Take a look around your bathroom. See what ordinary things you can transform.

“Untitled” by [Jim]

As a reminder: Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“Sink” by Vivian Chen

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

“Untitled” by Ben Roffer

2015 Challenge, Week 9: MACRO – NATURE

We are back to our Macro theme, and this time will be focusing on nature macros.

“Water Drops” by Sergiu Bacioiu

Insects, water droplets, flowers — the possibilities here are endless.

“You’re The Only One” by Lotus Carroll

This is another subject that can work in both black and white and in color. You can also find lots of subjects no matter what the season in your area.

“Autumn’s Crystals2″ by John

As a reminder: Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“Net-Winged Beetle” by Mika Andrianoelison

If you want to really challenge yourself, try using a water droplet in your image as a lens to show details of what is behind the droplet.

“pussy willow and dandelion” by Steve Wall

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 8: ARCHITECTURE – BRIDGES

This week, we will focus on architecture. Specifically, bridges.

“Williamsburg Bridge” by Thomas Hawk

Bridges can be very flexible subjects for a photographer. You can shoot them in black and white or color, day or night.

“Rotterdam: Erasmus Bridge” by Roman Boed

“Dongting Bridge” by Steve Webel

Try shooting in both landscape and portrait orientations. Try a square crop. Since bridges tend to be both tall and wide, you can often emphasize different parts of the structure simply by changing the orientation of the image.

“Through The Bridge” by Tuncay

“bridge pylons” by David

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

“Sayers Covered Bridge” by James Walsh

2015 Challenge, Week 5: MACRO – COMPUTER

It’s time for another Macro challenge! This time, lets point our lenses at that thing we are sitting in front of. And yes, your smartphone is also a computer, so feel free to explore it via macro images if you wish.

Computers have become part of our everyday life. But have you taken the time to look at them closely through your lens?

“VGA Connector” by Programator2

Connectors can be interesting when viewed close up, but don’t forget about the guts of the beast.

untitled, by Eivind Sorgenfryd

“Central Processing Unit” by Luis Romero

This kind of subject can really lend itself to a black and white image. Try making a few of your images this week in black and white, and see if you prefer that over color.

“Industrial Macro #5″ by Christian

“Who Needs Information?” by Shawn Clover

As a reminder: Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“CPU Pin Graveyard” by Arthur Caranta

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 1: MACRO – KITCHEN

Welcome to the 2015 Challenge! Are you ready for another year of challenges? During 2015, each of the four Photochallenge authors will be sticking to a theme, and presenting challenges based on that theme. My theme for the year will be MACRO. This week, lets look for macro photography opportunities in the kitchen.

“co-dependent” by Nick Fletcher

Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“Dinnerware Edge” by Theen Moy

Often, a macro photograph of an everyday object yields an interesting perspective. Take a look around your kitchen and try shooting some macro photographs of what you find there.

“Uncanny” by Snowshoe Photography

Look at all the different utensils and machinery in your kitchen, and don’t forget about the food! Macro photography of anything is OK this week, as long as it’s kitchen related.

“Spaghetti” by Chris Jones

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 49: Composition – Experiment

The year is winding down, and we have just one more Composition challenge for you: Experiment!

“Experiment ; The crowd in Praha” by Le Batteur De Lune

So far, we have tried the following techniques:

This week, feel free to experiment! You could combine several techniques that we have tried during the year. You could do some long exposure streaky lights.

“long shutter experiment” by Tahmid Munaz

Feel free to experiment with different camera settings, different backgrounds, different lighting, and different processing. One advantage of digital photography is that you can see the results quickly, and try lots of different things without spending anything on film and developing. So take advantage of it!

“Daily App Experiment #338 “Rider”” by Doctor Popular

If you need some inspiration, try a search on Flickr for “experiment” or “experimental”. That will get you started. Now get out there and have fun!

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

“Future City” by Sparky

Photochallenge Calendars Now Available!

DSCF0981

Back in September, we announced that we were going to publish a calendar, and invited the members of photochallenge.org to contribute photos. You were very generous in your contributions, and we are happy to announce that the calendars are now available for purchase!

As you may recall, the founding member of photochallenge.org, Trevor Carpenter, was diagnosed with leukemia. He is recovering, but the medical expenses have been adding up. The photochallenge.org admins decided that we wanted to do something to help Trevor out, and that is where the idea for the calendar came from.

Photochallenge.org is free for everyone, and we are going to keep it that way. We love the community that has grown up around the challenges. If you feel the same way, and you want to do something for the man that started it all, consider purchasing a calendar.

Thanks to all the members who generously contributed their work to the project, and thanks to everyone who makes photochallenge.org such a fun place to share photography!