2014 Challenge, Week 49: Composition – Experiment

The year is winding down, and we have just one more Composition challenge for you: Experiment!

“Experiment ; The crowd in Praha” by Le Batteur De Lune

So far, we have tried the following techniques:

This week, feel free to experiment! You could combine several techniques that we have tried during the year. You could do some long exposure streaky lights.

“long shutter experiment” by Tahmid Munaz

Feel free to experiment with different camera settings, different backgrounds, different lighting, and different processing. One advantage of digital photography is that you can see the results quickly, and try lots of different things without spending anything on film and developing. So take advantage of it!

“Daily App Experiment #338 “Rider”” by Doctor Popular

If you need some inspiration, try a search on Flickr for “experiment” or “experimental”. That will get you started. Now get out there and have fun!

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

“Future City” by Sparky

Photochallenge Calendars Now Available!

DSCF0981

Back in September, we announced that we were going to publish a calendar, and invited the members of photochallenge.org to contribute photos. You were very generous in your contributions, and we are happy to announce that the calendars are now available for purchase!

As you may recall, the founding member of photochallenge.org, Trevor Carpenter, was diagnosed with leukemia. He is recovering, but the medical expenses have been adding up. The photochallenge.org admins decided that we wanted to do something to help Trevor out, and that is where the idea for the calendar came from.

Photochallenge.org is free for everyone, and we are going to keep it that way. We love the community that has grown up around the challenges. If you feel the same way, and you want to do something for the man that started it all, consider purchasing a calendar.

Thanks to all the members who generously contributed their work to the project, and thanks to everyone who makes photochallenge.org such a fun place to share photography!

2014 Challenge, Week 45: MACRO

This week, lets move away from composition and try a technical subject: MACRO. Macro photography usually refers to extreme close up photography. Generally very small or detailed subject matter is rendered at life size or higher on the sensor or film.

“A Conceptual Model Of The Universe” by Jeremy Brooks

Subject matter for macro photography is often from the natural world. A macro photograph of a familiar subject can yield interesting details that are normally not visible.

“Eye” by Helga Birna Jónasdóttir

A macro photograph of water droplets can make the droplets act as lenses, showing subjects that are behind the droplets.

“white-bellied camo-drops in their natural habitat” by Steve Wall

To make macro photographs, you can use special settings on your camera, or use special lenses. Most cameras with fixed lenses will have a macro mode. When the macro mode is enabled, the camera will focus at much closer distances, allowing you to get the camera very close to the subject. Cameras with interchangeable lenses will offer special macro lenses that are capable of focusing on subjects that are close to the lens. If you do not have a macro lens, you can use the “poor man’s macro” technique — basically you flip the lens around and focus by moving very close to the subject. The lens will not mount to the camera body when flipped around, so you have to hold it in place. This takes some practice, but you can achieve very good results with patience and practice. For more information on this technique, Google “Poor Mans Macro“, or check out the Flickr group.

“Fire Ant” by Roby Edrian

Now it’s your turn! Get out there and take a close look at the world around you. Let’s see your best macro shot!

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 41: COMPOSITION – RULE OF ODDS

This weeks composition challenge is all about looking at things in an odd way — an odd number, that is.

“Odd Numbers” by Billy Abbott

One of the simplest ways to make a composition more dynamic is to have an odd number of objects in it, rather than an even number. An even number of things tends to make the viewer pair or group the objects. However, an odd number of things tends to make it more difficult to pair the objects, which keeps the eyes moving across the composition.

“Three Across” by Thomas Hawk

Since the subject matter is not limited on this challenge, you should have plenty of opportunity to watch for odd numbers of things, and come up with an interesting image for the week.

“Five Pillars” by Peter Kirkeskov Rasmussen\

Architecture, nature, still life, macro, color, black and white — it’s all fair game for this challenge!

“The Magnificent Seven” by « м Ħ ж »

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.

Now get out there and find something odd!

2014 Challenge, Week 37: COMPOSITION – LINES & PATTERNS

This weeks challenge is to make a composition that includes lines and/or patterns.

Architecture subjects can be a good source of lines and patterns.

“windows” by Antonio Culicigno

This image has strong lines, includes a person (notice the composition puts the person on one of the thirds) and uses reflection effectively.

“Lines” by Georgie Pauwels

Lines don’t have to be straight. Curved lines can be appealing as well.

“Lines And Curves” by Jon Herbert

When looking for patterns, try to find things that are repeating in interesting ways.

“red monster” by joseph.steufer

“Disrupting The Pattern” by Matthias Weinberger

“wishbone spiral” by paul bica

The rules are pretty simple:

Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+, Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

Now get out there, find some lines and patterns, and have fun!

Photochallenge Calendars – For A Good Cause

“Desk Calendar” by stopthegears

Hello Photochallenge friends! As you may have read, Trevor, the founding member of photochallenge.org, has been fighting Leukemia for the last year or so. He has had ups and downs, but is on the road to recovery.

Gary, one of the other photochallenge authors, came up with an idea to help Trevor out with the mounting expenses related to his illness, and the rest of us think it is a great idea. We are going to publish a photochallenge.org 2015 calendar using images that you, the photochallenge.org members, submit! All proceeds from the sales of the calendar will go directly to Trevor and his family.

To submit a photo, go to the photochallenge.org group on Facebook, click the “Albums” tab, and add your photo to the “2015 Photochallenge.org Calendar” album.

The photo:

  1. Must be a photo you made for one of the 2014 challenges.
  2. Must not have any watermarks; we will list your name with the image on the calendar.
  3. Should include a title.
  4. Must specify which challenge it was for.

The photochallenge authors will select images to include on the calendar based on image format, image size, and how many we can fit on the calendar. Due to limited space on the calendar, we cannot guarantee that every submitted image will be used, but we will include as many as possible. If we get enough submissions, we may consider more than one calendar, each with a different theme. Submissions will be due by the end of September, and calendars will be available for purchase by the end of October.

Submitting an image for consideration means that you are granting a worldwide, perpetual license for the image to be used in the 2015 Photochallenge.org calendar and for promotional purposes related to the calendar. Photochallenge.org is not asserting any ownership of the image, and the image will not be used for other purposes.

We are really looking forward to seeing what everyone chooses to submit, and we thank you for your support!

Update: We have had some people ask how they can submit images via Flickr and Google+. For those sites, just tag the image you want to submit with “photochallenge2015calendar”. We will use the tag to find images. Thanks!

2014 Challenge, Week 36: LANDSCAPE – HORIZON

Hello all, we are back to the LANDSCAPE theme, and this week’s theme gives you a lot of leeway. In fact, most of the landscape themes we have practiced this year could be adapted to fit this theme.

“big skies” by Georgie Sharp

This week, try to get the big picture. Show us sweeping, grand landscapes, with a clearly defined horizon.

“Sunset from Sète” by JM L.

When shooting, try using a smaller aperture to get lots of depth of field. This will help convey a sense of scale and the feeling that the horizon goes on and on and on….

“Ocean Flight” by Simon & His Camera

Don’t be afraid of black and white. The contrast between sky and land can be shown nicely in a black and white image.

“Untitled” by santo rizzuto

Have a wide angle lens? Don’t be afraid to use it! If you don’t have a wide lens, try making a panorama!

“Miles of Sky” by Kevin Galens

Sky? Yes! Clouds? Oh yeah! Snow? You know it! Mountains? Absolutely! Ocean? Of course! Sunset? Oui!

There are a lot of landscape horizon opportunities out there, you just have to get out and shoot!

The rules are pretty simple:

Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+, Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.