About Steve (Stefano) Troletti

I'm a Location Scout, Editorial, Nature, Wildlife and Environmental Photographer based in Malibu, California. I specialize in Nature and Urban Nature photography including Infrared Landscapes. The Bulk of my work takes place in the Los Angeles, California area, Montreal, Canada, Canton de Fribourg, Switzerland and Varese a province in Northern Italy. Ethical wildlife photography is the main priority and focus of my work. A minimum disturbance of the animals, their habitat and the environment is my top priority. This applies as much to total wilderness areas as it does to urban nature environments. Ongoing education of environmental issues and building awareness for the protection of wildlife and wilderness areas around the world is what drives me to document the beauty that surrounds us.

2015 Challenge, Week 15 : OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – MIGRATING BIRDS

The Spring bird migration is finally in full swing and will hit the Northern States and Canada this weekend. While the Northern Hemisphere is in Spring Migration, Fall migration is taking place in the Southern Hemisphere. This week we’ll focus on the newly arriving species for each of our very own localities.

For those of you who are new to this, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology has you covered in the USA with their migration forecasts : http://birdcast.info/forecast/regional-migration-forecast-10-17-april/ I’m sure similar information is available on the web for just about every region in the world

Large birds of prey to the minuscule hummingbirds are in route to their summer nesting grounds. Some have a yearly migration route as far as Argentina to Northern Canada and back. In the Greater Montreal Area Owls, Red Polls, Juncos, etc… head north in Spring to make room for their Southern Cousin’s arrival.

Red-winged blackbird - First migrant

Red-winged blackbird – First migrant

One of our early migrants is the Red-winged blackbird. They huddle by the bird-feeders hoping for a warmer day. They usually get caught in unpredictable weather from late winter storms to extremely cold nights.

Black duck fending off Mallard Duck

Black duck fending off Mallard Duck

The most common ducks are quick to follow. With Spring fever in the air territorial conflicts are quick to come about.

Canada Goose Feeding

Canada Goose Feeding

Geese aren’t far behind. These large water fowls not only look for water but feed on grass and the remains of last year’s crops until a new vegetation starts to flourish.

Great Blue Heron landing

Great Blue Heron landing

As soon as a creek melts open the Great Blue Heron makes its presence known. One of the last herons to leave in December, it promptly makes its way back in early Spring.

Black-crowned night heron

Black-crowned night heron

I was however very surprised to find this Black-crowned night heron perched in a tree so early on in the season.

Great egret

Great egret

Even more surprising was this Great egret. All of these herons have an inherent fear of man. Your presence may spook them, so be careful. If they fly away, just settle in and be patient. If there’s food they will be back. Just avoid loud noises and jerky movement.

Mating Lori parakeets

Mating Lori parakeets

Some birds are already mating and nest building. It’s important to keep a respectable distance to totally minimize our impact on these birds. We don’t want to stress them to the point where they leave their nesting grounds, especially if eggs are already in the nest.

Please show the up-most in respect for our feathered friends. We want to capture a natural looking image of a relaxed bird. A stressed animal will show in your images and lower the appeal all together. Take time to observe the birds and get familiar with them. Birds are curious in nature and if you’re patient, still and quiet, you’ll be rewarded.

This Photo Challenge is entirely about having FUN OUTDOORS! PLEASE KEEP MAN MADE ITEMS OUT of your image as this theme is entirely NATURE based.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 12 : ARCHITECTURE – WINDOWS LOOKING OUT

We sometimes think of Architectural photography as looking at a building from the outside. A great deal of Architectural engineering and design is often invested in giving a look from the inside to the outside. Windows and glass paneling connects us with the outside world, illuminating the indoors and often enhancing its appearance

Coit Tower City View

Not all windows have glass panes. Many older structures in Europe and the Middle-East have but openings carved out of the structure and protected by shutters when necessary. I find it connects us better with the world outside our four walls.

NYC Window View (a la Edward Hopper)

Not all windows give us the dream view we’re all contemplating. For some it’s but the hustle and bustle of urban life. This New York City hotel Room view is the perfect example.

Pier Window

Even this abandoned building on the peer has a dream view through it’s industrial windows that is the envy of many Malibu homes.

I'm a young one stuck in the thoughts of an old one's head. (205)

You can add portraiture to your architectural image thus enhancing the sense of being and of welfare.

Breakfast with a View
At times Photo-Realistic HDR techniques of two or more images are needed to fully capture the ambiance of a room. The brightly lit outdoor scene needs to be balanced with the poorly lit view of the room.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 11 : OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – HAKA

This week I decided to change things around a bit. I still want to get you outdoors since this is outdoor photography. I’m bringing back a theme from 2013, the HAKA, also known as the Maori war dance. Rooted in ancient polynesian culture, the HAKA has been brought back to life with the ALL BLACKS, New Zealand’s national Rugby Team.

Wikipedia describes the HAKA as; The Haka (plural is the same as singular: haka) is a traditional ancestral war cry, dance or challenge from the Māori people of New Zealand. It is a posture dance performed by a group, with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet with rhythmically shouted accompaniment.

HAKA positions

For those of you into Rugby, the All Blacks Rugby team performs a ritual HAKA prior to every game. The first step will be to familiarize yourself with the various positions of the HAKA. Although the WHAKA is the most commonly used position, have fun experimenting. The more participants you get in your photo the better it will be!

Backlit HAKA

Since this is an OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE, the setting is as important as the models performing the HAKA. Take care in finding the perfect outdoor spot for your HAKA. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different lighting. Backlit subjects and silhouettes will add a creative touch to your HAKA as well as give anonymity to a shy participant.

HAY HAKA

Just because you’re the photographer doesn’t mean you can’t participate. Don’t forget your tripod, set your camera timer and join your HAKA.

Steve and Francois HAKA

Not all HAKA pictures have to be planned ahead and organized. Some can be spontaneous and just as much fun to make.

HAKA Princess

This Photo Challenge is entirely about having FUN OUTDOORS! Get creative and have fun with family and friends creating the best HAKA ever.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 7 Outdoor Photography – WIND

After fighting a bad cold for a week, I decided to get out of the house and find some inspiration for this week’s Outdoor Photography Challenge. It didn’t take long. As I crossed a small pedestrian bridge, I found myself blasted by a very cold winter wind. I looked down to the frozen river and it suddenly all became clear, WIND!

Wind had sculpted the snow atop the frozen river much like it does with the sand dunes of the Sahara Desert. Although wind in itself is invisible, it’s effect on our environment are on the contrary, quite visible.

Steve Troletti Photography: INFRARED - INFRAROUGE &emdash; Wrath of GOD - IR

The sculpted snow captured the long term effect of Wind. Long after the wind dies down it’ll still be there. We can also capture the present movement of wind in a long exposure. The cross remains still as it is solid and solidly anchored into the ground. Meanwhile the surrounding leaves and branches swing back and forth with the wind.

Steve Troletti Photography: GULLS, TERNS / GOÉLANDS et STERNES (Laridae / Sternina) &emdash; Translucent Feathers - Ring Billed Gull / Plumes translucides - Goéland à bec cerclé

Birds themselves can take advantage of the wind. This Ring-billed Gull harnesses the power of the wind to hover steadily above the river’s flowing waters patiently scouting for its next meal.

Birds aren’t the only ones who harness wind. For thousands of years man has harnessed the wind with sails to propel it’s ships. We now create our own wind to propel amphibian crafts. This Hovercraft is the perfect example of a fully artificial wind powered man-made craft.

Tornado.JPG

From Dust Devils to Tornadoes to Hurricanes, Mother Nature often has the final word when it comes to harnessing the destructive power of wind. There are endless possibilities when it comes to documenting wind. Whether it’s the after affect or the direct effect wind currently has on our environment, Mother Nature and Man or in a constant tug of war with wind.

It’s still an OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY Challenge, so you have to go outdoors to complete your challenge. Try and apply all the techniques we’ve practiced over time. Pay attention to your composition and distractions in the background. Come up with more than a snapshot, create a PHOTOGRAPH that tells a story. Although we usually only ask for a photo, I’d like to see a small paragraph that describes the impact and emotion of your photograph, further adding to the editorial value of this assignment.

Please don’t take any unnecessary risks completing your challenge. Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

Get acquainted with plants like Poisson Oak and Poisson Ivy or any other dangerous plants in your area. Some plants not only represent a risk of skin irritation but can also kill you if touched or ingested. Learn to identify the dangerous plants in your area.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Nature and Wildlife photography can be a great family activity

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 4 Outdoor Photography – MAN MADE IN NATURE

I’m taking over for Trevor this week with yet an other Outdoor Photography Challenge :-)

This week I want to focus on Man Made objects in nature. This is in huge contrast to last year’s Nature and Wildlife themes which excluded any man made objects.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Mon pays c'est l'hiver / Winter WonderlandAs in the above image your setting is to be in a nature type environment. This old red barn contrasts with the wintery white forest. Pay attention to the rules of composition as they remain important throughout the creative process.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; L��tang de la Maison de l'arbreYou don’t have to be in the middle of a forest. This image taken in Montreal’s Botanical Garden immerses you in nature yet in the middle of metropolitan Montreal.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Fall is definitely here / L'automne est bel et bien làAgain here, the Montreal Back River in a nature setting. Two man made dams and a bridge in the distance. The hand of man is more and more present as we venture into our natural environment.

_TRA7031-totocheSometimes it can be your own little private getaway, a treehouse nestled in a pine forest!

Man made objects are everywhere. Some old some new. Focus on a man made object nestled in a natural setting. Experiment with different angles, depth of field and lighting.

Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

Get acquainted with plants like Poisson Oak and Poisson Ivy or any other dangerous plants in your area. Some plants not only represent a risk of skin irritation but can also kill you if touched or ingested. Learn to identify the dangerous plants in your area.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Outdoor photography can be a great family activity.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 3 Outdoor Photography – TREES

Image

The 2015 Challenge is off to a great start. Gary just gave us a great mind boggling challenge that had me looking at everything from a great new perspective.

I’ve decided to change things around from Nature & Wildlife to simply Outdoor Photography. It may seem trivial, but deep down under my thinking cap there’s a devious plan to challenge everyone through 2015. Naturally I’ll keep a focus on nature. This is at times challenging because we have members from all over the globe experiencing different seasons at different times, differently. We all know winters are a little different in Long Beach, CA than they are in Long Beach, NJ.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Winter Fruit for Thought / Fruits de l'hiver pour une penséeTrees breathe life into our planet. They do so at so many levels, directly and indirectly. They provide food and shelter for wildlife and humans. They also prevent erossium and evaporation of water as they grow along waterways. Outdoor photography is generally editorial and this week we’ll document life in and around trees.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; American Robin / Merle d'AmeriqueWinter may seem like a barren time for trees but that isn’t true at all. The berry of the Shadbush provides nutrition for many Northern birds through the coldest months. This very fruit has made it possible for the American Robin to survive and strive further and further North expanding into new territory.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Juniper Berries on the Rocks - Baies de genièvre sur glaceAs you go even further North, evergreens take over. The Juniper tree not only provides shelter for a variety of wildlife throughout the winter, it also feeds them with it’s berries, just like the Shadbush.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Survival - Cold and Windy Day! / La survie - Journée froide et venteuse!Sometimes it’s just not that obvious. At -22C this little Nuthatch is scouring through the bark looking for hibernating insects, larva and maybe some hidden seeds and nuts. It’s beak is perfectly adapted for this task.

Raton laveur - RaccoonTrees not only provide food and shelter for birds. Many mammals like squirrels and this baby Raccoon will find refuge from cold temperature and predators inside a hollowed out tree. Every hole in every tree has a story to tell.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Dark Fishing Spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus)Not every hole in every tree is home to something cute and cuddly. Weather permitting, many Spiders make trees their home. There’s no better place to hide than in the fortified walls of a tree trunk

Sans titre Some insects even build their homes on, in and around trees. This Wasp Nest is a good indicator of the life present around this tree throughout the warmer months. In turn these wasps also provide food for birds and their hatchlings.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; The Fox and Squirrel... / Le renard et l'écureuil ...Sometimes the tree doesn’t provide lunch, It’s what stands between you and your lunch. Both predator and prey can benefit from trees.  How efficiently they interact with trees can make all the difference when it comes to survival.

LumièreLeaves will die and fall to the ground. This annual process will help replenish nutrients in the soil for future generations of trees to grow healthy.

This tree is growing along a stream. For now the stream will provide water for this tree to grow. With time the tree will provide the shade to prevent evaporation. This will help maintain a water source for animals and agriculture throughout the summer months.

Don’t let your gear bog you down. The above image is an Instagram taken just a few weeks ago with a two year old Nexus 4 Smartphone. The best camera is the one you have in your hands at that time. Learn the true limitations of your equipment and then capitalize on its strengths.

For this challenge try and apply all the techniques we’ve practiced over time. Pay attention to your composition and distractions in the background. Come up with more than a snapshot, create a PHOTOGRAPH that tells a story. Although we usually only ask for a photo, I’d like to see a small paragraph that describes the impact and emotion of your photograph, further adding to the editorial value of this assignment.

I’ve but barely unearthed the surface of what trees can do for our planet. They have an impact on our daily lives and mass deforestation in one area can affect climate around the world.

Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

Get acquainted with plants like Poisson Oak and Poisson Ivy or any other dangerous plants in your area. Some plants not only represent a risk of skin irritation but can also kill you if touched or ingested. Learn to identify the dangerous plants in your area.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Nature and Wildlife photography can be a great family activity

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 51 Nature & Wildlife – WILD MAMMALS

Just yesterday I had a strange encounter, a skunk was scavenging by bird feeders. Not the first time I had seen a skunk in winter, but they are rare this time of year. This one was also white and huge. I had already packed the camera gear in the car and by the time I arrived in the general vicinity of my sighting, it was gone. Thus came my inspiration for this week’s challenge.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Red Fox on the run! / Renard roux à la course!

Mammals photograph better at around eye level. So on smaller mammals you’re going to have to get down and low. In North America and Europe the Red Fox is probably one of the most photographed predators. It’s also my favorite.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Red Fox Kit / Renardeau (Vulpes vulpes)

Our friends in the Southern hemisphere will have an extra privilege,  little baby mammals of all shapes and sizes. Remember that parents will protect their young and often the least dangerous looking animal may be the worst. Always keep a safe distance and never cut off an animal’s exit route.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Chamois

Some animals are extremely hard to approach, like this Chamois. They fear man and only patience will get you close enough for a picture. Although I was lucky to capture this young Chamois in a field in Switzerland, most of them live in difficult to access areas like cliffs.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Gray wolves in the Snow / Loups gris dans la neigesIf the great outdoors seems intimidating there are many natural habitat rescue centers and wildlife refuge that offer great opportunities to get closer to a wild animal. The above wolves were photographed at the Ecomuseum in St-Anne-de-Bellevue. Encouraging these establishments helps fund rescue efforts in the wild.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; North American River Otter / Loutre de rivièreNot all mammals live on land. This North American River Otter spends most of its time in water feeding on fish and amphibians. It also will build its den on the river bank.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Little brown bat / Petite chauve-souris brune (Myotis lucifugus)We even have flying mammals. Bats make interesting subjects. Finding them may prove to be tricky. If you find a bat resting during the day, chances are you’ll have all the time in the world to photograph it.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Eastern Gray Squirrel Drinking a Fresh Cup of Tim Hortons Coffee! / Écureuil gris buvant un bonne tasse de café Tim HortonsWorst comes to worst, if all else fails, there’s always the local population of squirrels. They tend to come in all shapes and sizes. From little ground squirrels to their larger cousin, the groundhog.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Treehog or Groundhog in a tree? / Marmotte communeIf you’re looking for a groundhog, well you might also want to look up in the trees. Contrary to popular belief these critters tend to spend time out of their den and up in the trees. They are very closely related to their smaller cousin, the squirrel.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Canada Lynx / Lynx du CanadaLarge wild cats like this Lynx are absolutely magnificent on snow. Actually I find them magnificent period. However they cautiously avoid man. When they chance an encounter with man you have to know what you’re doing. There’s a great deal of precaution to take so you don’t provoke an attack. Behaving like prey won’t help your case. If you’re in large cat (Mountain Lion, Tiger, Lion,…) and/or bear territory make sure you have the experience and knowledge to take care of yourself. If not, be cautious and hire a local, experienced guide.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; Fardoche - The Alaskan Sled Dog / Fardoche, le chien de traîneauNot to insult my dear friend Fardoche, the Alaskan sled dog, but as this is Nature and Wildlife, domesticated animals and house pets aren’t on the agenda. Try to get out there, enjoy the outdoor and bring back a great image!

Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Nature and Wildlife photography can be a great family activity

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

I wish you all a great Holiday Season and a Happy New Year! I’ll see you next year with a new formula for the 2015 PhotoChallenge :-)