2015 Challenge, Week 6: NUMBERS – Prime Numbers

This week your challenge is to shoot a specific type of number – a prime number. For those that need a refresher on prime numbers:

A prime number (or a prime) is a natural number greater than 1 that has no positive divisors other than 1 and itself.

That’s the definition of a prime number from Google, and you’re probably familiar with the first few: 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, etc. I expect we’ll see a lot of shots with those numbers, but if you what to really challenge yourself, here’s a list of prime numbers to 1000: http://primes.utm.edu/lists/small/1000.txt

For this challenge shoot actual numbers, not a group objects. This challenge is about the actual numbers.

“7” by Martin Gommel

You can shoot the prime alone, or in a group of other numbers. You might even get lucky and get multiple primes in the same shot, like the one below.

“[8/52] 47 45 43 41e” by tomekmusicv

Remember to think about the technical aspects of the shot, not just the number. The shot below uses depth of field to focus attention on a specific number. Also notice the lighting. It’s natural light, but comes from behind so the frost stands out.

“29, 83, 6″ by Franz Jachim

The shot below uses repetition and lines, as well as depth of field. Also note that the numbers are not the subject, they are just an accent that breaks up the color.

“Seats ready for people_Design Museum Copenhagen” by Rob Deutscher

If you like math, shooting prime numbers should add some enjoyment to the challenge. Maybe we’ll even see some creative shots based on mathematics. I just like prime numbers. They feel natural to me, and I tend to notice them more than other numbers.

“13” by Alexander Makarov

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) per theme shot during the week of the challenge to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 2: NUMBERS – 10 and Under

The first week of 2015 flew by, now it’s time to introduce the second theme for the year – Numbers. This year I’ll posting themes that have to do with numbers. In many ways numbers define our lives. We count our age (north of 40), size of our family (5 in my house), our weight (for good or bad), anniversaries (married 22 years), employment history (6 jobs) – just about everything can be described in some way by numbers.

Even photography is defined by numbers: shutter speed, F-stop, focal length, ISO,  memory card, sensor megapixels, and, well, you get the idea.

For this week we’ll keep it basic – take a photo of a number 10 or under. There is one constraint: no addresses. Every home and business has a street address so those are easy. Your challenge is to find a number, then make an interesting shot. You can take a picture of a single number, or a group of numbers, as long as the number(s) are 10 or lower.

“Numbers..” by Søren Rajczyk

As you frame your shoot, think about the technical aspects of your composition. The shot above frames a repeating pattern with a strong leading line. The use of black and white enhances the lines and emphasizes the tones. You can imagine the numbers continuing forever.

“Numbers in the orange” by Leonid Mamchenkov

This shot also uses repetition with lines, but contrasts the brightly colored seats with the small, black circles holding the numbers.

“25 / 52 Numbers” by Sergio García Moratilla

You can also use depth of field to focus attention on a specific part of the frame.

Numbers sound like simple subjects, and they are. The challenge isn’t in the number – it’s in taking something that is commonplace and looking at it in a new way. With the subject determined, your challenge is in the composition. Don’t just snap a picture of the first number you find. Get creative and focus on the composition. We all will use the same numbers, but each of us will create a different photo.

“4 Plane” by AlwaysBreaking

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 1: MACRO – KITCHEN

Welcome to the 2015 Challenge! Are you ready for another year of challenges? During 2015, each of the four Photochallenge authors will be sticking to a theme, and presenting challenges based on that theme. My theme for the year will be MACRO. This week, lets look for macro photography opportunities in the kitchen.

“co-dependent” by Nick Fletcher

Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“Dinnerware Edge” by Theen Moy

Often, a macro photograph of an everyday object yields an interesting perspective. Take a look around your kitchen and try shooting some macro photographs of what you find there.

“Uncanny” by Snowshoe Photography

Look at all the different utensils and machinery in your kitchen, and don’t forget about the food! Macro photography of anything is OK this week, as long as it’s kitchen related.

“Spaghetti” by Chris Jones

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 48 Landscape – Cityscapes/Townscapes

You guys have been doing such a nice job lately. As you may recall, I’ve been proposing themes of the landscape variety, all year. Many of the times, I’ve seen some comments regarding the inability of some to get out into nature for some of the landscapes. So this week, I’m gonna make it a little easier for us all. We’ll be shooting a cityscape, or a townscape for those of you not too close to a city.

Downtown Cityscape San Francisco

“Downtown Cityscape San Francisco”, by David Yu

 

The principles are the same as a landscape. Wide-angle is better. Including as much varied detail will help keep it complex and fun. As you can see from some of the examples, dusk and evening shots might give you access to one very special addition you haven’t been able to use in our past landscapes, and that’s artificial light! Slow enough of a shutter speed and you can even get nice looking light-painting from moving automobiles and their lights. But a daytime shot will work just fine. Conceive what you want, try to plan for it, and execute!

San Diego Cityscape

“San Diego Cityscape”, by Justin Brown

 

I’d recommend a tripod for this one, so you can work with slower shutter speeds, and smaller apertures (yet larger numbers). A smaller aperture will allow you to have a much larger focal plane. That’s best for any sort of landscape, including cityscapes. You might also consider an Neutral Density filter, if you have one, or can get one. That’ll allow you to have even slower shutter speeds, allowing more light movement, etc. Here’s a good article to teach you better than I can.

Transamerica View 20141105

“Transamerica View 20141105″, by Jeremy Brooks

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.
山本園芸流通センター

“山本園芸流通センター”, by m-louis .®

 

2014 Challenge, Week 25: COMPOSITION – FRAMING

This week, lets get back to a technical challenge and talk about framing when composing the photo. Framing is a composition technique that allows you to emphasize the subject by blocking parts of the photo with something in the scene.

“Framed Sunset” by Sudhamshu Heb

Framing your subject with something in the frame can give the photo context, helping the viewer understand where the image was taken and what was happening. It can draw attention to the subject. It can give the image a sense of depth.

“In The Frame” by Alison Christine

If you are not sure how to frame an image like this, try looking out of a window. Including the walls around the window will frame the subject outside the window.

“Window On The World” by Jeremy Brooks

Framing can also be used to add interest to a portrait. Perhaps you could try to make a portrait this week by framing your subject in an interesting or different way.

“s1″ by Melissa Brooks

As always, please post/share a photo you take THIS WEEK. We love your old photos, but not for the challenge. The point of the PhotoChallenges is for you to set out to create a new photo, to share with us all this week. Share them with us all at our Google+ CommunityFacebook Group, and/or our Flickr Group.

Now go have some fun!

2014 Challenge, Week 24: LANDSCAPE – SUNSET/SUNRISE

I’ve been almost completely absent, for quite a while. Jeremy, Gary, and Steve have carried my commitments and this blog really well. And I thank them. Unfortunately, they’ll be stepping up again to carry us through the next few months, probably without me at all. I truly am grateful for their help. Additionally, these men have been good friends through my unique journey. Most of you do not know, but I was diagnosed with Leukemia almost a year ago. Last year’s treatment went well enough, and I was in remission. In April of this year I fell out of remission and I am next week going back in for a bone marrow transplant. Super sorry to start off this post with suck a downer. I’m not seeking sympathy or pity. I just want to share with you all what’s going on with me. Feel free to message me on any of our social networks if you have questions, etc, about this. I really want to keep PhotoChallenge.org focused on our challenges and your photographs!

Sunset through the Arch

“Sunset through the Arch”, by katsrcool

This week I’m looking forward to what you create! If you recall, I’m having you all focus on landscape photographs. This week I want to see either a sunset or sunrise photo, with a wonderful landscape framing it up. Consider many of the past landscapes that we’ve done, in order to get a decent balance. Maybe even go back and read the other posts, to pick up on some of the techniques.

Lookout

“Lookout”, by Juan Lois

Consider that either a sunset or a sunrise photograph will heavily depend on the captured sky. You might want some clouds or contrails to give the sun’s light something to colorize. But don’t forget that the setting and rising sun’s light, being so distinct and often super intense, can colorize other things well too, like the focus of your landscape; mountains, trees, and even the bulk of a rolling landscape will all be transformed.

Layered Lone Pine Light

“Layered Lone Pine Light”, by Howard Ignatius

Many wonderful natural objects can be transformed quite nicely when silhouetted against a distinct sky. So, consider how different your landscape may be exposed, when it’s all so underexposed that it’s black.

Barras do horizonte

“Barras do horizonte”, by Eduardo Amorim

As always, please follow our guidelines:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 13: LANDSCAPE – VANISHING ROAD

As I look at some of my own favorite landscape photographs, I tend to migrate to certain styles and/or certain subjects. I think the same could be true for many of us, with all sorts of types of photos. So as I looked at my own faves, I found that one common subject was some sort of road.

Take the black road

“Take the black road”, by Trevor Carpenter

If you didn’t know already, lessons from more traditional forms of art can lend themselves to the photographer. A study of Rembrandt’s paintings can help the portrait photographer. The impressionists can help us with composition. And on and on. One of the most basic of art projects is the vanishing point. Many who take illustration, sketching, and/or basic art tend to do a few projects with a vanishing point.

Verge

“Verge”, by Daniel Zedda

As photographers, we can look out for opportunities to highlight an existing vanishing point. And for this landscape theme, I’d like you to specifically apply the vanishing point concept to a vanishing road, on your horizon. Here’s a brief Google+ post about using vanishing point in your photography, by Brian Matiash.

To be specific, I’m looking for you to compose a traditional landscape, but deliberately include some sort of road. However I want you to compose the image with the road traveling off, away from the camera, towards a vanishing point. Pay attention to balancing where you place the horizon. Sometimes is just works to have the horizon bisect the photo. Most of the time, however, it’s a little freshman to do so. Experiment with having the horizon be high, so that you capture more foreground. Or, place the horizon low, to include more sky. Either way, your photos tend to be nicer, when the horizon is NOT in the middle.

Road to Rome

“Road to Rome”, by Tommy Clark

As always, please post/share a photo you take THIS WEEK. We love your old photos, but not for the challenge. The point of the PhotoChallenges is for you to set out to create a new photo, to share with us all this week. Share them with us all at our Google+ Community, Facebook Group, and/or our Flickr Group.

The Road to Ribblesdale

“The Road to Ribblesdale”, by Luc B