2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 46: URBAN DECAY – SELECTIVE COLOR(S)

Here we are slowly getting closer to the end of the 2016 PhotoChallenge. For some reason it keeps getting harder to come up with FUN and CREATIVELY-MOTIVATING PhotoChallenges. This one came to me like a light bulb lighting up in a dark room. I went from absolutely no idea (Bad Ideas) to this ingenious Challenge.

Steve Troletti Editorial, Nature and Wildlife Photographer: City Streets / Rue de la Ville &emdash; BREAKING NEWS: Steve Troletti, Photographer and Adventurer, Finds the Entrance to THE BAT CAVE!

I actually first thought of drabbing or grunging it, at least a sepia/vignette look. Looking through my images, I found the image above and that’s when I realized that selective colors, RED in this case, would have totally changed the image.

Steve Troletti Editorial, Nature and Wildlife Photographer: City Streets / Rue de la Ville &emdash; The Haunted House / La Maison Hant�e

Falling onto this image of mine, I figured that allowing not only ONE SELECTIVE COLOR but multiple in targeted areas of the image would better bring-out the photographer’s vision…

Steve Troletti Editorial, Nature and Wildlife Photographer: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Urban Decay : When Clean Drinking Water Stops Flowing!

Here’s what I tried to accomplish with the image above. I truly wanted to put forward a message of water, more specifically water scarcity. Although all the Urban Decay elements were in place, the colors of the graffiti on the wall overwhelmed the message. Selecting the items necessary to portray the message and applying selective colors to only those items made them standout in the image.

What your final IMAGE will need :

  • The scenery must show some sort of urban decay.
  • Areas of your image that are the most important to portray your vision as a photographer must maintain a level of color/colors.
  • The remainder of the image must be in B&W, GRAYSCALE, SEPIA, etc…
  • A short text to define and portray your vision to the rest of the world.

As usual focus on the in-camera attributes of your image. Apply yourself composition-wise and experiment taking different images at different angles, apertures and height. A tripod is always a great tool when experimenting. You may even want to push your images further with HDR or other technique we’ve covered in the 2016 PhotoChallenge.

 

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge and #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should not be a Video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 12 : ARCHITECTURE – WINDOWS LOOKING OUT

We sometimes think of Architectural photography as looking at a building from the outside. A great deal of Architectural engineering and design is often invested in giving a look from the inside to the outside. Windows and glass paneling connects us with the outside world, illuminating the indoors and often enhancing its appearance

Coit Tower City View

Not all windows have glass panes. Many older structures in Europe and the Middle-East have but openings carved out of the structure and protected by shutters when necessary. I find it connects us better with the world outside our four walls.

NYC Window View (a la Edward Hopper)

Not all windows give us the dream view we’re all contemplating. For some it’s but the hustle and bustle of urban life. This New York City hotel Room view is the perfect example.

Pier Window

Even this abandoned building on the peer has a dream view through it’s industrial windows that is the envy of many Malibu homes.

I'm a young one stuck in the thoughts of an old one's head. (205)

You can add portraiture to your architectural image thus enhancing the sense of being and of welfare.

Breakfast with a View
At times Photo-Realistic HDR techniques of two or more images are needed to fully capture the ambiance of a room. The brightly lit outdoor scene needs to be balanced with the poorly lit view of the room.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2014 Challenge, Week 12: Nature and Wildlife Photography – BUDS

Spring, it finally arrived. Although it may not look like it outside for some folk, nature is showing some signs of Spring. One that we’re sure to find all over the Northern Hemisphere is a bud. Whether it be from a tree, flower or plant, nature is showing some sort of new life even in Arctic Canada.

Steve Troletti Photography: NATURE & LANDSCAPES &emdash; Blooming Magnolia

The blooming bud of a Magnolia tree may attract the most attention. They’re not only large but are also very pretty. Their large size makes them easier to photograph as a close-up.

Tulipbud

Tulips don’t bud as early as Magnolias but in the warmer climate areas they should be ready for some interesting and colorful photography.

Budding

A little closer to mother nature, forest trees are full of buds. Some will turn into leaves and  fruit trees will follow with flower buds later in the season. The buds on some trees can be very small. A macro lens may be necessary to capture the full details of these smaller buds.

Budding Cactus

Desert folks, no need to worry, Cactus and other types of vegetation growing in arid areas  also wait for spring to bud and come out in full bloom. Again the larger size of these plants may not necessitate a macro to fully capture every detail!

2000px-Plant_Buds_clasification.svg

I got this chart from Wikipedia as a reference to identifying the different stages and types of buds. It should also facilitate the task of locating buds on different types of plants. You can reference the full Wikipedia article on buds @ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bud

BUD BEER

F.Y.I. the above image is not exactly what we’re looking for 🙂

To fully take advantage of the sunlight, early mornings and late afternoons will provide a lower angle and softer light to work with.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2014.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2014 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.