2015 Challenge, Week 12 : ARCHITECTURE – WINDOWS LOOKING OUT

We sometimes think of Architectural photography as looking at a building from the outside. A great deal of Architectural engineering and design is often invested in giving a look from the inside to the outside. Windows and glass paneling connects us with the outside world, illuminating the indoors and often enhancing its appearance

Coit Tower City View

Not all windows have glass panes. Many older structures in Europe and the Middle-East have but openings carved out of the structure and protected by shutters when necessary. I find it connects us better with the world outside our four walls.

NYC Window View (a la Edward Hopper)

Not all windows give us the dream view we’re all contemplating. For some it’s but the hustle and bustle of urban life. This New York City hotel Room view is the perfect example.

Pier Window

Even this abandoned building on the peer has a dream view through it’s industrial windows that is the envy of many Malibu homes.

I'm a young one stuck in the thoughts of an old one's head. (205)

You can add portraiture to your architectural image thus enhancing the sense of being and of welfare.

Breakfast with a View
At times Photo-Realistic HDR techniques of two or more images are needed to fully capture the ambiance of a room. The brightly lit outdoor scene needs to be balanced with the poorly lit view of the room.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 11 : OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – HAKA

This week I decided to change things around a bit. I still want to get you outdoors since this is outdoor photography. I’m bringing back a theme from 2013, the HAKA, also known as the Maori war dance. Rooted in ancient polynesian culture, the HAKA has been brought back to life with the ALL BLACKS, New Zealand’s national Rugby Team.

Wikipedia describes the HAKA as; The Haka (plural is the same as singular: haka) is a traditional ancestral war cry, dance or challenge from the Māori people of New Zealand. It is a posture dance performed by a group, with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet with rhythmically shouted accompaniment.

HAKA positions

For those of you into Rugby, the All Blacks Rugby team performs a ritual HAKA prior to every game. The first step will be to familiarize yourself with the various positions of the HAKA. Although the WHAKA is the most commonly used position, have fun experimenting. The more participants you get in your photo the better it will be!

Backlit HAKA

Since this is an OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE, the setting is as important as the models performing the HAKA. Take care in finding the perfect outdoor spot for your HAKA. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different lighting. Backlit subjects and silhouettes will add a creative touch to your HAKA as well as give anonymity to a shy participant.

HAY HAKA

Just because you’re the photographer doesn’t mean you can’t participate. Don’t forget your tripod, set your camera timer and join your HAKA.

Steve and Francois HAKA

Not all HAKA pictures have to be planned ahead and organized. Some can be spontaneous and just as much fun to make.

HAKA Princess

This Photo Challenge is entirely about having FUN OUTDOORS! Get creative and have fun with family and friends creating the best HAKA ever.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 10: NUMBERS – 50mm

In many ways photography boils down to numbers. The F-stop, shutter speed, ISO, and focal length all determine the technical aspects of a shot. This week your challenge is to use a single focal length: 50mm. The subject is wide open. Shoot anything you want, but shoot it at a 50mm focal length. If you have prime 50mm lens, use that. If you only have a zoom lens, set the zoom as close to 50 as you can get it.

(Edit) If you have no control over your zoom, here’s an alternate challenge: Shoot any number that’s a multiple of 50.

“Pastel (

Helios 77M-4 50mm f1.8 m42)” by Sorin Mutu With the proliferation of zoom lenses and camera kits, it’s easy to experiment with framing by simply changing your zoom. Using a single focal length forces you to move to try different compositions. When you move, you see things differently and may come up with a better shot. Spending a week with a single focal length will change your perspective on framing.

“Canon EF 50mm F1.4 Testshot” by 55Laney69

Before zoom lenses became the norm, 50mm was a standard lens. Every photographer had a 50mm lens, for good reason. 50mm allows you to shoot a wide range of subjects. It may be the most versatile focal length there is.

“50mm Chicago” by Brian Koprowski

You can everything shoot from landscapes to portraits with a 50mm. They also perform well in all lighting conditions.

“Dibs the Cat” by Derrick Story

If you don’t own 50mm prime lens, I highly recommend getting one. Prime lenses are generally sharper than zoom lenses. I have a 50mm prime lens that is my first choice. It’s tack sharp and goes down to F1.4. But if you don’t have one, use what you have. All DSLR kits come with a zoom that will allow you to shoot at (or near) 50mm.

“Bubble Nose” by Bill Bumgarner

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 9: MACRO – NATURE

We are back to our Macro theme, and this time will be focusing on nature macros.

“Water Drops” by Sergiu Bacioiu

Insects, water droplets, flowers — the possibilities here are endless.

“You’re The Only One” by Lotus Carroll

This is another subject that can work in both black and white and in color. You can also find lots of subjects no matter what the season in your area.

“Autumn’s Crystals2″ by John

As a reminder: Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“Net-Winged Beetle” by Mika Andrianoelison

If you want to really challenge yourself, try using a water droplet in your image as a lens to show details of what is behind the droplet.

“pussy willow and dandelion” by Steve Wall

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 8: ARCHITECTURE – BRIDGES

This week, we will focus on architecture. Specifically, bridges.

“Williamsburg Bridge” by Thomas Hawk

Bridges can be very flexible subjects for a photographer. You can shoot them in black and white or color, day or night.

“Rotterdam: Erasmus Bridge” by Roman Boed

“Dongting Bridge” by Steve Webel

Try shooting in both landscape and portrait orientations. Try a square crop. Since bridges tend to be both tall and wide, you can often emphasize different parts of the structure simply by changing the orientation of the image.

“Through The Bridge” by Tuncay

“bridge pylons” by David

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

“Sayers Covered Bridge” by James Walsh

2015 Challenge, Week 7 Outdoor Photography – WIND

After fighting a bad cold for a week, I decided to get out of the house and find some inspiration for this week’s Outdoor Photography Challenge. It didn’t take long. As I crossed a small pedestrian bridge, I found myself blasted by a very cold winter wind. I looked down to the frozen river and it suddenly all became clear, WIND!

Wind had sculpted the snow atop the frozen river much like it does with the sand dunes of the Sahara Desert. Although wind in itself is invisible, it’s effect on our environment are on the contrary, quite visible.

Steve Troletti Photography: INFRARED - INFRAROUGE &emdash; Wrath of GOD - IR

The sculpted snow captured the long term effect of Wind. Long after the wind dies down it’ll still be there. We can also capture the present movement of wind in a long exposure. The cross remains still as it is solid and solidly anchored into the ground. Meanwhile the surrounding leaves and branches swing back and forth with the wind.

Steve Troletti Photography: GULLS, TERNS / GOÉLANDS et STERNES (Laridae / Sternina) &emdash; Translucent Feathers - Ring Billed Gull / Plumes translucides - Goéland à bec cerclé

Birds themselves can take advantage of the wind. This Ring-billed Gull harnesses the power of the wind to hover steadily above the river’s flowing waters patiently scouting for its next meal.

Birds aren’t the only ones who harness wind. For thousands of years man has harnessed the wind with sails to propel it’s ships. We now create our own wind to propel amphibian crafts. This Hovercraft is the perfect example of a fully artificial wind powered man-made craft.

Tornado.JPG

From Dust Devils to Tornadoes to Hurricanes, Mother Nature often has the final word when it comes to harnessing the destructive power of wind. There are endless possibilities when it comes to documenting wind. Whether it’s the after affect or the direct effect wind currently has on our environment, Mother Nature and Man or in a constant tug of war with wind.

It’s still an OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY Challenge, so you have to go outdoors to complete your challenge. Try and apply all the techniques we’ve practiced over time. Pay attention to your composition and distractions in the background. Come up with more than a snapshot, create a PHOTOGRAPH that tells a story. Although we usually only ask for a photo, I’d like to see a small paragraph that describes the impact and emotion of your photograph, further adding to the editorial value of this assignment.

Please don’t take any unnecessary risks completing your challenge. Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

Get acquainted with plants like Poisson Oak and Poisson Ivy or any other dangerous plants in your area. Some plants not only represent a risk of skin irritation but can also kill you if touched or ingested. Learn to identify the dangerous plants in your area.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Nature and Wildlife photography can be a great family activity

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org. or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 6: NUMBERS – Prime Numbers

This week your challenge is to shoot a specific type of number – a prime number. For those that need a refresher on prime numbers:

A prime number (or a prime) is a natural number greater than 1 that has no positive divisors other than 1 and itself.

That’s the definition of a prime number from Google, and you’re probably familiar with the first few: 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, etc. I expect we’ll see a lot of shots with those numbers, but if you what to really challenge yourself, here’s a list of prime numbers to 1000: http://primes.utm.edu/lists/small/1000.txt

For this challenge shoot actual numbers, not a group objects. This challenge is about the actual numbers.

“7” by Martin Gommel

You can shoot the prime alone, or in a group of other numbers. You might even get lucky and get multiple primes in the same shot, like the one below.

“[8/52] 47 45 43 41e” by tomekmusicv

Remember to think about the technical aspects of the shot, not just the number. The shot below uses depth of field to focus attention on a specific number. Also notice the lighting. It’s natural light, but comes from behind so the frost stands out.

“29, 83, 6″ by Franz Jachim

The shot below uses repetition and lines, as well as depth of field. Also note that the numbers are not the subject, they are just an accent that breaks up the color.

“Seats ready for people_Design Museum Copenhagen” by Rob Deutscher

If you like math, shooting prime numbers should add some enjoyment to the challenge. Maybe we’ll even see some creative shots based on mathematics. I just like prime numbers. They feel natural to me, and I tend to notice them more than other numbers.

“13” by Alexander Makarov

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) per theme shot during the week of the challenge to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.